snibgo's ImageMagick pages

Editing with hald cluts

A brief introduction.

We show how hald cluts can be manipulated and used.

Hald cluts

A hald clut is a Colour Look-Up Table with three dimensions, a cube, but stored by IM as a square image. The table is indexed by an RGB triplet, and each entry in the table is also an RGB triplet, so the colours in an image can be transformed by a hald clut.

I don't know the origin of the word "hald". Perhaps an acronym: "Higher And Lower Dimension"? Or named after the person who devised it? I don't know.

IM's "-hald-clut" operation takes two images: an ordinary input image, and a hald clut. It creates a new image the same size as the input image. For every input image pixel, the RGB values of that pixel are used as coordinates into the cube, and the RGB values found at that location in the cube are used for the new image. Ideally the cube would have 2Q pixels along each dimension, but it usually has fewer, so the coordinates will fall between entries, and IM interpolates.

The "-hald-clut" operation is many-to-one. Each input colour maps to only one output colour, but many input colours may map to the same output colour.

An ordinary clut (aka 1D clut) transforms channels independently. For example, a pixel that has 10% in the red channel transformed by a particular clut will result in a particular output red value, whatever the input values of the other channels. A 3D clut is a more generalised version; a 10% red value may transform into any number of red values, depending on the values in the other channels. Any 1D clut can be represented by a 3D clut.

A 3D hald clut is represented in IM by a 2D image. The pseudo-format "hald:N" creates an image that represents an identity (aka unity) hald clut, where each entry is equal to the indexing coordinates. Applying the identity hald clut to an image results in no changes to the image.

%IM%convert hald:4 eh_h4.png
eh_h4.pngjpg
%IM%convert hald:8 eh_h8.png
eh_h8.pngjpg

The "filename" gives the level, for example "hald:8" has level=8. The minimum level is 2.

The image is square, with rows=columns=level3, eg 83=512. Hence the hald-clut has level6 pixels. It contains level2 values per channel, so hald:8 contains 64 values per channel. It is a cube with 64 pixels in each dimension. If we want 256 values per channel, so the hald contains all possible 8-bit colours, we need hald:16.

The 3D coordinates of the cube (r,g,b) and the 2D coordinates of the square (x,y) map to each other:

0 <= r, g, b < level2 
0 <= x,y < level3 

r = x % level2 
g = x / level2 + (y % level) * level
b = y / level

x = r % level2 + (g % level) * level2 
y = b * level + g / level

(Many graphics programs have the equivalent of hald cluts, but the mapping between 2D and 3D is often different. IM's hald clut image is difficult for humans to interpret. As it is constrained to be a square, not all cube sizes can be represented. A scheme that showed the slices of the cube side by side might be more helpful. A cube sized 643 would be represented by a 2D image 4096x64 instead of 512x512.)

In coders/hald.c, the identity hald-clut is populated like this:

cube_size=level*level;

for y = 0 to rows-1 {
  blue = y / level;
  x = 0;
  for green = 0 to cube_size-1 {
    for red = 0 to cube_size-1 {
      SetPixelRed (x, y, QuantumRange * red / (cube_size-1));
      SetPixelGreen (x, y, QuantumRange * green / (cube_size-1));
      SetPixelBlue (x, y, QuantumRange * blue / (cube_size-1));
      x++;
      if (x==columns) {
        x = 0;
        y++;
      }
    }
  }
}

Integer division is used throughout. The unmodified hald clut contains only integer values, in the range zero to QuantumRange.

In the identity hald clut:

IM's "-hald-clut" operation assumes the clut is absolute, that the entry at each RGB coordinates gives the colour required. An alternative is the relative clut, where the entry (which can be positive or negative) needs to be added to the RGB coordinates to calculate the colour required. Put it another way, the entry needs to be added to the absolute identity clut.

We can easily convert between the two forms:

relative_clut + absolute_identity_clut = absolute_clut

The absolute identity clut is colourful, as shown above. The relative identity clut is completely zero. Relative cluts can be negative, so should be processed and saved as HDRI. We can easily create a relative identity clut:

%IMDEV%convert -size 512x512 xc:Black eh_relid.miff

We apply the sparse values to the relative clut, not the absolute clut. Why? Suppose we have a known sample at coordinate 60%, with a value of 80%. Interpolating values at other coordinates (such as 50% and 70%) from this sample, we don't want them to be influenced towards 80%. Instead, we want them to be influenced towards values that are 20% above their respective coordinates.

With interactive editor

We append a hald to an image, edit the combined image, then extract the hald, and use it to modify any images in the same way.

Step 1: append the hald

%IM%convert ^
  %SRC% ^
  hald:8 ^
  -gravity South ^
  -append ^
  eh_s1.png
eh_s1.pngjpg

Step 2: edit the image

Using Gimp or Photoshop or any image editor, open the file eh_s1.png and change the colours. Save the result and a lossless format such as PNG.

In Gimp, we use Colors | Hue-Saturation to change the hue, lightness and saturation of "green", with a fairly large overlap.

eh_gimp1.pngjpg

In Gimp, we export the image as eh_s1_ed.png.

Step 3: extract the hald

%IM%convert ^
  eh_s1_ed.png ^
  -gravity South ^
  -crop 512x512+0+0 +repage ^
  eh_s1e.png
eh_s1e.pngjpg

Step 4: use the hald

We can apply the same hald to any image we want.

%IM%convert ^
  toes.png ^
  eh_s1e.png ^
  -hald-clut ^
  eh_toes_h.png
eh_toes_h.pngjpg
%IM%convert ^
  zp_sus_sat.jpg ^
  eh_s1e.png ^
  -hald-clut ^
  eh_zss_h.png
eh_zss_h.pngjpg

With non-interactive editor

If we have a complex transformation comprising many passes over the image, and we need to apply this to many images, it will be faster to apply it once to a clut, then apply that clut to each image.

%IM%convert ^
  hald:8 ^
  -colorspace Lab ^
  -channel R -sigmoidal-contrast 2,50% ^
  -channel GB -sigmoidal-contrast 1.2,50% ^
  +channel ^
  -colorspace sRGB ^
  -auto-level ^
  eh_nie.png
eh_nie.pngjpg
%IM%convert ^
  toes.png ^
  eh_nie.png ^
  -hald-clut ^
  eh_toes2_h.png
eh_toes2_h.pngjpg
%IM%convert ^
  zp_sus_sat.jpg ^
  eh_nie.png ^
  -hald-clut ^
  eh_zss2_h.png
eh_zss2_h.pngjpg

With sparse values

We can make a hald from a small number of samples. For example, we change #b09090 to #90b0b0, while pinning the eight corners of the colour cube so they are not changed.

%IMDEV%convert ^
  ( xc:#b09090 xc:Black xc:White ^
    xc:Red xc:Lime xc:Blue ^
    xc:Cyan xc:Magenta xc:Yellow ^
    +append ) ^
  ( xc:#90b0b0 xc:Black xc:White ^
    xc:Red xc:Lime xc:Blue ^
    xc:Cyan xc:Magenta xc:Yellow ^
    +append ) ^
  -define compose:clamp=off ^
  ( -clone 0-1 ^
    -compose MinusDst -composite ^
  ) ^
  -delete 1 ^
  -append ^
  -process 'sphaldcl haldlevel 8 method shepards power 5 v' ^
  eh_sp1.png
eh_sp1.pngjpg
%IM%convert ^
  toes.png ^
  eh_sp1.png ^
  -hald-clut ^
  eh_toes3_h.png
eh_toes3_h.pngjpg
%IM%convert ^
  zp_sus_sat.jpg ^
  eh_sp1.png ^
  -hald-clut ^
  eh_zss3_h.png
eh_zss3_h.pngjpg

As previous, but also pinning colours close to the skin colour.

%IMDEV%convert ^
  ( xc:#b09090 xc:Black xc:White ^
    xc:Red xc:Lime xc:Blue ^
    xc:Cyan xc:Magenta xc:Yellow ^
    xc:#808080 xc:#8080a0 xc:#80a080 xc:#80a0a0 ^
    xc:#e08080 xc:#e080a0 xc:#e0a080 xc:#e0a0a0 ^
    +append ) ^
  ( xc:#90b0b0 xc:Black xc:White ^
    xc:Red xc:Lime xc:Blue ^
    xc:Cyan xc:Magenta xc:Yellow ^
    xc:#808080 xc:#8080a0 xc:#80a080 xc:#80a0a0 ^
    xc:#e08080 xc:#e080a0 xc:#e0a080 xc:#e0a0a0 ^
    +append ) ^
  -define compose:clamp=off ^
  ( -clone 0-1 ^
    -compose MinusDst -composite ^
  ) ^
  -delete 1 ^
  -append ^
  -process 'sphaldcl haldlevel 8 method shepards power 5 v' ^
  eh_sp2.png
eh_sp2.pngjpg
%IM%convert ^
  toes.png ^
  eh_sp2.png ^
  -hald-clut ^
  eh_toes4_h.png
eh_toes4_h.pngjpg
%IM%convert ^
  zp_sus_sat.jpg ^
  eh_sp2.png ^
  -hald-clut ^
  eh_zss4_h.png
eh_zss4_h.pngjpg

For more details of this method, see Sparse hald cluts.

Algebra of hald cluts

Where "⊗" represents applying an absolute clut to an image, usually with IM's "-hald-clut" operation.

absolute_clut = relative_clut + absolute_identity_clut

relative_clut = absolute_clut - absolute_identity_clut

image ⊗ absolute_identity_clut = image

(image ⊗ clut1) ⊗ clut2 = (image ⊗ clut2) ⊗ clut1

(image ⊗ clut1) ⊗ clut2 = image ⊗ (clut1 ⊗ clut2)

Future

For tweaking of ranges of colours, we could use a process that adjusted a 3D clut, at given centre and radius or SD (or three of each), with distributions: box, triangle, or Gaussian.

Ordinary (1D) cluts, when cumulative and normalised, are essentially the same as 1D histograms. They can be inverted and applied to each other, and used to adjust one image so its 1D histograms match those of another. I suspect 3D cluts and histograms have analogous properties.

3D cumulative histograms can probably be created in the same way as 2D integral images.


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%IM%identify -version
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Copyright: Copyright (C) 1999-2015 ImageMagick Studio LLC
License: http://www.imagemagick.org/script/license.php
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Page version v1.0 3-August-2017.

Page created 15-Aug-2017 19:42:51.

Copyright © 2017 Alan Gibson.